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Citizen Fact Check

on Top Gun-Safety Votes 2017-2020

A constituent resource for separating truth from fiction
about lawmakers' stands on Second Amendment issues.
1. Nullifying Rule on Background Checks (Social Security)
(Votes Lookup at Roll Call #77)
The House on Feb. 2, 2017, voted, 235-180, to nullify an Obama Administration rule designed to keep the mentally ill from passing federal background checks on gun purchases. Under the rule, the Social Security Administration was required to notify the FBI's National Instant Criminal Background Check System of individuals receiving disability benefits on the basis of mental impairment. Opponents said the rule cut against both disability and Second Amendment rights, while supporters said it was only common sense to keep guns away from the deranged. A yes vote was to send HJ Res 40 to the Senate, where it was adopted and sent to President Trump, who signed it into law.

2. Nullifying Rule on Background Checks (Veterans)
(Votes Lookup at Roll Call #169)
Voting 240-175, the House on March 16, 2017, passed a bill that would require patient-by-patient judicial review before the Department of Veterans Affairs could submit the names of veterans with serious mental issues to the FBI's system of background checks on gun purchasers. Under the bill (HR 1181), a judicial authority would have to rule the person "mentally defective" before any referral could be made to the FBI. Referral foes said they violate Second Amendment rights, while backers said it was only common sense to keep guns away from a population afflicted by post-traumatic stress disorder and high rates of suicide. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate, where if failed.

3. Federalizing State Laws on Concealed-Carry
(Votes Lookup at Roll Call #663)
Voting 231-198, the House on Dec. 6, 2017, sent the Senate a bill (HR 38) that would make it easier for travelers to carry concealed, loaded handguns from state to state. The bill would federalize the patchwork of state laws on concealed handguns by requiring every state to recognize every other state's concealed-carry permit or authority. In part, this would allow residents of the 12 states that did not require permits to legally carry concealed handguns in the many states that deny permits to domestic-abusers, stalkers and convicted felons. The bill also would tighten reporting requirements for the FBI's National Instant Criminal Background Check System. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate, where it failed.

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