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U.S. House

Top Gun-Safety Votes of 2017-2019 (cont'd)

4. Refusing to Exempt Violent Criminals from Concealed-Carry Bill
(Votes Lookup at Roll Call #662)
Voting 190-236, the House on Dec. 6, 2017, refused to amend HR 38 (above) so that it would deny protection to concealed-carry permit holders who have been convicted of a violent crime in the preceding three years. Under the amendment, these individuals would be prevented from carrying a concealed, loaded handgun in any state other than their own whose laws deny a permit based on a conviction for the same crime. A yes vote was to add an exemption for violent criminals to the bill.

5. Prohibiting Debate on Post-Parkland Gun Bills
(Votes Lookup at Roll Call #83)
On a vote of 228-184, the House on Feb. 27, 2018, blocked a Democratic resolution allowing the House to debate two gun-safety bills. One (HR 3464) would prevent a firearms dealer from selling a weapon before completion of a federal background check. The second (HR 4240) would incentivize reporting to the FBI’s National Instant Criminal Background System. It also would expand criminal and mental-health background checks to cover all firearms transactions except those among family members, friends and hunting partners, thus ending exemptions for certain purchases occurring at gun shows, over the Internet and through classified ads. This vote was conducted after Republican leaders, who controlled the House agenda, declined to immediately bring gun legislation to the floor following a Feb. 14, 2018, mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

The Democratic resolution was quashed by the presiding officer's ruling that it did not qualify under House rules as a "privileged question" entitled to floor action. On the vote reported here, Republicans upheld that ruling after it was appealed by Democrats. A yes vote was in opposition to allowing floor debate on the two bills.

6. Refusing to Expand Gun Background Checks
(Votes Lookup at Roll Call #229)
Voting 224-191, the House on May 24, 2018, blocked a Democratic attempt to amend the fiscal 2018 military budget (HR 5515) to expand background checks on commercial gun transactions. The motion would require checks on sales over the Internet and between private parties at gun shows, closing loopholes that allow an estimated 40 percent of gun sales to avoid mandatory checks by the FBI's National Instant Criminal Background Check System. This was the first congressional vote on gun issues since a shooting six days earlier at a Santa Fe, Texas, high school that killed 10 people and wounded 10 others. A yes vote was in opposition to adding language on background checks to the fiscal 2019 military budget.

7. Expanding Gun Background Checks
(Votes Lookup at Roll Call #99)
Voting 240-190, the House on Feb. 27, 2019, passed a bill (HR 8) that would expand federal background checks of prospective gun buyers by extending the requirement to transactions on the internet and between private parties at venues including gun shows and parking lots. Now, only licensed dealers must run buyers' personal information through the FBI's National Instant Criminal Background Check System. The NICS was established in 1993 by the so-called Brady bill, which outlaws the sale of firearms to convicted felons, drug addicts, abusive partners, fugitives, persons with serious mental illness and undocumented immigrants. This bill would exempt sales between family members and would waive background checks for transfers for hunting and when a purchaser faces imminent threat of great bodily harm. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate.

8. Reporting Gun Buys by Undocumented Immigrants
(Votes Lookup at Roll Call #98)
Voting 220-209, the House on Feb. 27, 2019, adopted a Republican motion to HR 8 (above) under which undocumented immigrants must be reported to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) when the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) detects they are attempting to buy a firearm. A yes vote was to add the GOP-sponsored provision to the bill.

9. Extending Period for Gun Background Checks
(Votes Lookup at Roll Call #103)
Voting 228-198, the House on Feb. 28, 2019, passed a bill (HR 1112) that would extend from three business days to 20 business days the maximum period for deferring firearms sales when FBI background checks on buyers remain uncompleted. The bill would apply to the estimated 10 percent of prospective sales not promptly cleared or denied by the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS). If the check remains open after 10 business days, purchasers could file a petition asserting their eligibility to acquire a firearm. If the matter remains unresolved for another 10 business days – bringing the total deferral to 20 business days -- the sale would automatically take effect. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate.

10. Exempting Victims of Domestic Violence
(Votes Lookup at Roll Call #102)
Voting 194-232, the House on Feb. 28, 2019, defeated a Republican motion that would exempt victims of domestic violence from the delays of up to 20 days that HR 1112 (above) would impose on unfinished gun background checks. The measure would allow these individuals to acquire a firearm after three business days even when the FBI has not yet approved or denied the prospective sale. A yes vote was to adopt the motion.

Copyright 2020, Thomas Voting Reports, Inc.